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Quotes

Quote #16

Yet she had only the dimmest idea of who Goldstein was and what doctrines he was supposed to represent. She had grown up since the Revolution and was too young to remember the ideological battles of the fifties and sixties. Such a thing as an independent political movement was outside her imagination: and in any case the Party was invincible. It would always exist, and it would always be the same. You could only rebel against it by secret disobedience or, at most, by isolated acts of violence such as killing somebody or blowing something up. (2.5.8)

Winston is critical of Julia’s view of sex as limited to a form of private rebellion against the Party.

Quote #17

The conspiracy that he had dreamed of did exist, and he had reached the outer edges of it […].

What was happening was only the working-out of a process that had started years ago. The first step had been a secret, involuntary thought, the second had been the opening of the diary. He had moved from thoughts to words, and now from words to actions. The last step was something that would happen in the Ministry of Love. (2.7.16-17)

The rebellion trajectory is now complete for Winston: from starting a journal, to having an affair, to the imminent induction into the Brotherhood by O’Brien, Winston has finally attained the status of the true rebel.

Quote #18

"They can’t get inside you. If you can feel that staying human is worth while, even when it can’t have any result whatever, you’ve beaten them."

He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day, but if you kept your head you could still outwit them. (2.7.30-31)

Winston believes that as long as his rebellious spirit is intact, the Party can not triumph.

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