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Quotes

Quote #22

He obeyed the Party, but he still hated the Party. In the old days he had hidden a heretical mind beneath an appearance of conformity. Now he had retreated a step further: in the mind he had surrendered, but he had hoped to keep the inner heart inviolate. He knew that he was in the wrong, but he preferred to be in the wrong. (3.4.24)

After months of torture, Winston outwardly obeys the Party, but inwardly does not resign his rebellious spirit.

Quote #23

But the proles, if only they could somehow become conscious of their own strength, would have no need to conspire. (1.7.2)

Winston believes that any hope in overthrowing the Party lies in the proles – if only they were smart enough.

Quote #24

Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious. (1.7.4)

Having reached a metaphysical paradox, Winston concludes that which he does not wish to believe: the Proles will never gain the consciousness required for them to effectively rebel.

Thought 2: For the proles, consciousness is as necessary for rebellion as the latter is for consciousness. Unfortunately, that paradox is the proles’ futile plight.

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