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Quotes

Quote #4

Meg said in a startled way, "I guess I never thought of that. I guess I just took it for granted." (3.13-14)

And this is what privilege looks like: having something good and never even thinking that other people don't have the same thing. Calvin makes Meg realize for the first time that family love isn't a sure thing in life, but something precious that she should be grateful for.

Quote #5

"No. At first we got lots of letters. Mother and Father always wrote each other every day. I think Mother still writes him every night. Every once in a while the postmistress makes some kind of a crack about all her letters."

"I suppose they think she's pursuing him or something," Calvin said, rather bitterly.

"They can't understand plain, ordinary love when they see it. Well, go on. What happened next?" (3.152-154)

For all Meg's worrying that everyone else is normal, and she (and her family) are not, here Calvin reverses the perspective: it's the townspeople who can't recognize the value of the "plain" and "ordinary."

Quote #6

"But I must know what happens to the children," the Medium said. "It's my worst trouble, getting fond. If I didn't get fond I could be happy all the time." (6.64)

Love is the enemy of happiness? Perhaps, but what kind of happiness is there without caring about anyone or anything? The happy medium that Mrs. Murry and the twins advise Meg to strive for is looking less and less desirable...

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