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Quotes

Quote #7

[...] therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal'd,
At least in my opinion. (4.2.5)

When Bertram tries to seduce Diana with empty promises, she sees right through him. (Once Bertram thinks he's slept with Diana, he drops her and even lies about it later.) Still, does this mean Bertram deserves to be played by Helen and Diana when the women pull off a bed trick? You decide.

Quote #8

When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I'll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer'd my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver'd:
And on your finger in the night I'll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done. (4.2.9)

With Diana's help, Helen is able to pull off a bed trick, where one sexual partner is secretly substituted for another. This plot device was pretty common back in Shakespeare's day. Do we see anything like this in modern literature?

Quote #9

Come,
bring forth this counterfeit module, he has deceived
me, like a double-meaning prophesier. (4.3.20)

Finally, Bertram sees Paroles for what he really is: a fraud, a liar, and a back-stabbing coward.

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