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Quote #1

The stupidest questions of all were asked by Mollie, the white mare. The very first question she asked Snowball was: "Will there still be sugar after the Rebellion?"

"No," said Snowball firmly. "We have no means of making sugar on this farm. Besides, you do not need sugar. You will have all the oats and hay you want."

"And shall I still be allowed to wear ribbons in my mane?" asked Mollie.

"Comrade," said Snowball, "those ribbons that you are so devoted to are the badge of slavery. Can you not understand that liberty is worth more than ribbons?"

Mollie agreed, but she did not sound very convinced. (2.3-2.7)

Okay, we get that "sugar" and "ribbons" don't sound like something to get worked up about. But try substituting "hot Cheetos" for "sugar" and "iPhones" for ribbons. Are you getting a little uncomfortable, now? If we told you that your PlayStation was a badge of slavery

Quote #2

As winter drew on, Mollie became more and more troublesome. She was late for work every morning and excused herself by saying that she had overslept, and she complained of mysterious pains, although her appetite was excellent. On every kind of pretext she would run away from work and go to the drinking pool, where she would stand foolishly gazing at her own reflection in the water (5.1).

You know what they say: you can lead a bourgeoisie mare to water, but you can't make her stop staring at her reflection to drink.

Quote #3

Mollie refused to learn any but the six letters which spelt her own name. She would form these very neatly out of pieces of twig, and would then decorate them with a flower or two and walk round them admiring them. (3.8)

We know we're dumping on Mollie a little bit, but don't blame us: blame Orwell. Mollie basically symbolizes every foolish, vain bourgeoisie idiot who's more concerned with how the Revolution is going to help him than how he can help the Revolution.

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