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Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy

Compassion and Forgiveness Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #7

"Not you it was performed that noble act of forgiveness, at which I was moved to ecstasy, and everyone else too, but He, working within your heart," said Countess Lidia Ivanovna, raising her eyes rapturously, "and so you cannot be ashamed of your act." (5.22.13)

Countess Lydia describes religion in overblown ways, but her actions do not match her rhetoric.

Quote #8

It is true that the erroneousness and shallowness of this conception of his faith was dimly perceptible to Alexey Alexandrovitch, and he knew that when, without the slightest idea that his forgiveness was the action of a higher power, he had surrendered directly to the feeling of forgiveness, he had felt more happiness than now when he was thinking every instant that Christ was in his heart, and that in signing official papers he was doing His will. But for Alexey Alexandrovitch it was a necessity to think in that way; it was such a necessity for him in his humiliation to have some elevated standpoint, however imaginary, from which, looked down upon by all, he could look down on others, that he clung, as to his one salvation, to his delusion of salvation. (5.22.26)

Although Karenin knows that his spontaneous forgiveness was more powerful than Countess Lydia's brand of religion, he embraces her approach anyway because he needs something to which he can cling. Head to Karenin's "Character Analysis" to learn more about his adoption of Countess Lydia's religious approach.

Quote #9

He asked for supper, and began telling her about the races; but in his tone, in his eyes, which became more and more cold, she saw that he did not forgive her for her victory, that the feeling of obstinacy with which she had been struggling had asserted itself again in him. He was colder to her than before, as though he were regretting his surrender. And she, remembering the words that had given her the victory, "how I feel on the brink of calamity, how afraid I am of myself," saw that this weapon was a dangerous one, and that it could not be used a second time. And she felt that beside the love that bound them together there had grown up between them some evil spirit of strife, which she could not exorcise from his, and still less from her own heart. (7.12.20)

Anna and Vronsky's relationship becomes increasingly embittered – there's a distinct lack of forgiveness in both of their hearts. This is in contrast to other relationships that we see, such as Dolly's forgiveness of Oblonsky, and Kitty and Levin's compassion for one another.

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