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Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy

Isolation Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

The attachment he felt to Anna precluded in his heart every need of intimate relations with others. And now among all his acquaintances he had not one friend. He had plenty of so-called connections, but no friendships. Alexey Alexandrovitch had plenty of people whom he could invite to dinner, to whose sympathy he could appeal in any public affair he was concerned about, whose interest he could reckon upon for anyone he wished to help, with whom he could candidly discuss other people's business and affairs of state. But his relations with these people were confined to one clearly defined channel, and had a certain routine from which it was impossible to depart. There was one man, a comrade of his at the university, with whom he had made friends later, and with whom he could have spoken of a personal sorrow; but this friend had a post in the Department of Education in a remote part of Russia. Of the people in Petersburg the most intimate and most possible were his chief secretary and his doctor. (5.21.10)

Without Anna, Karenin is truly alone. Here he realizes that he has no emotional connections with people. By the end of the novel, though, he does have some people whom he loves: his son and Anna's daughter, Annie.

Quote #5

As intensely as Anna had longed to see her son, and long as she had been thinking of it and preparing herself for it, she had not in the least expected that seeing him would affect her so deeply. On getting back to her lonely rooms in the hotel she could not for a long while understand why she was there. "Yes, it's all over, and I am again alone," she said to herself, and without taking off her hat she sat down in a low chair by the hearth. Fixing her eyes on a bronze clock standing on a table between the windows, she tried to think. (5.31.1)

In the hours following her reunion with her son Seryozha, Anna feels more alone than ever. Before meeting Vronsky, Seryozha was the most important person in Anna's life, and now she is separated from him. For more on Anna's relationship with Seryozha, check out her "Character Analysis."

Quote #6

Vronsky could not understand exactly what had passed between the Kartasovs and Anna, but he saw that something humiliating for Anna had happened. He knew this both from what he had seen, and most of all from the face of Anna, who, he could see, was taxing every nerve to carry through the part she had taken up. And in maintaining this attitude of external composure she was completely successful. Anyone who did not know her and her circle, who had not heard all the utterances of the women expressive of commiseration, indignation, and amazement, that she should show herself in society, and show herself so conspicuously with her lace and her beauty, would have admired the serenity and loveliness of this woman without a suspicion that she was undergoing the sensations of a man in the stocks. (5.33.33)

Despite outward composure, Anna is alone and defenseless in the face of Moscow's grandest society. As a result of her public affair, she's a complete outcast. The society women in particular are "amazed" and "indignant" that Anna is showing herself in public. Anna is now isolated from everyone but Vronsky.

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