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Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina

  

by Leo Tolstoy

Anna Karenina Part 3, Chapter 22 Summary

  • Vronsky uses Yashvin's hired carriage so that he's not recognized as he heads over to his date with Anna.
  • He's quite cheerful and happy to be meeting the woman he loves.
  • When he gets to the gardens, he recognizes Anna immediately although she is veiled.
  • Anna tells him that her husband now knows everything.
  • Vronsky becomes stern and proud because he believes Karenin will challenge him to a duel. Anna misinterprets his expression, believing instead that he feels offended for some reason.
  • They don't understand each other. Anna feels betrayed and thinks that her situation must continue as before, and Vronsky feels that there's no way Anna can continue being Karenin's wife.
  • Anna then brings up the question of Seryozha.
  • Both of them feel miserable and helpless, particularly Vronsky, who feels like everything is his fault.

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