From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Antigone

Antigone

  

by Sophocles

Challenges & Opportunities

Available to teachers only as part of the Teaching Antigone Teacher Pass


Teaching Antigone Teacher Pass includes:

  • Assignments & Activities
  • Reading Quizzes
  • Current Events & Pop Culture articles
  • Discussion & Essay Questions
  • Challenges & Opportunities
  • Related Readings in Literature & History

Sample of Challenges & Opportunities


Antigone may be nearly 2500 years old, but the play's themes are just as relevant today as they were when Sophocles first penned this gem. Church vs. State? Individual vs. Nature? Conflict between genders? Civil disobedience? Fate or free will? No doubt your students have dealt with one or more of these themes in their own lives (possibly even this week!), so they'll be able to identify with many of the issues Antigone presents. 

The play’s characters are also very easy to understand from a modern standpoint. It’s not hard for students to root for the upstart Antigone as she struggles to do what she thinks is right no matter the cost. Of course, it’s equally easy to understand Ismene, who just wants to avoid trouble. Even Creon is relatable as he desperately tries to maintain order in his war-torn city.