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Antigone

Antigone

  

by Sophocles

Antigone Theme of Determination

Determination is a nearly universal character trait amongst the cast of Antigone. Despite the important role of fate in the lives of the characters, Creon, Antigone, Ismene, and Polyneices are all driven, at times stubbornly, to pursue their goals. Determination in the play is linked to hubris and proves less an asset than a flaw to the characters that possess it.

Questions About Determination

  1. To what extent is determination an asset to characters in Antigone? How is it a hindrance?
  2. What, if any, correlation exists between determination and self-deception in the play?
  3. Are all of the determined characters in Antigone stubborn and arrogant, or do some exhibit a reasonable degree of determination? What might this suggest?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Determination to seek, to know, and to pursue principle is depicted as tantamount to self-injury in the Oedipus trilogy.

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