* Site-Outage Notice: Our engineering elves will be tweaking the Shmoop site from Monday, December 22 10:00 PM PST to Tuesday, December 23 5:00 AM PST. The site will be unavailable during this time.
Dismiss
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Antigone

Antigone

by Sophocles

Power Theme

Power both corrupts and metaphorically blinds characters in Antigone. The clearest example of power is King Creon of Thebes, who is arrogant, unperceptive, and downright mean to people around him.

Questions About Power

  1. How is Creon the Brother-in-Law (from Oedipus the King different from Creon the King?
  2. Do women have positions of power in Antigone trilogy? If so, how do they exercise their power?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

In Antigone, power corrupts. When simply the King's brother-in-law, Creon was a reasonable man, whereas when he inherits the role of king, he becomes arrogant and cruel.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Noodle's College Search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement