© 2015 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra

The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra

 Table of Contents

The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra Guilt and Blame Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

ANTONY As nearly as I may, I'll play the penitent to you; but mine honesty Shall not make poor my greatness, nor my power Work without it. (2.2.91)


Antony will admit his wrongs where he’s performed them, but he’s careful to say that his repentance of those actions doesn’t diminish his power. Antony claims that his ability to be honest and admit his flaws is actually a source of his greatness.

Quote #2

CLEOPATRA In praising Antony I have disprais'd Caesar. CHARMIAN Many times, madam. CLEOPATRA I am paid for't now. (2.5.106)


Cleopatra admits that she’s wronged Julius Caesar by praising Antony, and she now pays her dues for this. She is reminded of her ills against former lovers, but repents only after she is punished for them.

Quote #3

ANTONY Go, Eros, send his treasure after; do it; Detain no jot, I charge thee. Write to him- I will subscribe- gentle adieus and greetings; Say that I wish he never find more cause To change a master. O, my fortunes have Corrupted honest men! Dispatch. Enobarbus! (4.5.13)


Antony feels real compassion for Enobarbus. Rather than curse him for the betrayal, Antony berates himself, feeling guilty that his bad fortune has made honest men do what they otherwise would not.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Noodle's College Search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement