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Quotes

Quote #4

CHARLES
O, no; for the Duke's daughter, her cousin, so loves her,
being ever from their cradles bred together, that she would have
followed her exile, or have died to stay behind her. She is at
the court, [...]
and never two ladies loved as they do. (1.1.2)

We don't know about you, but we're glad to see that cousins Rosalind and Celia are so tight, especially given all the family drama in this play.  Ros and Celia grew up together and are more like sisters than cousins.  Check out "Characters" if you want to know more about this tight-knit bond.

Quote #5

ORLANDO
I am more proud to be Sir Rowland's son,
His youngest son--and would not change that calling
To be adopted heir to Frederick. (1.2.7)

When Duke Frederick talks smack about Orlando's dead dad, our boy Orlando demonstrates what family loyalty looks like.  For Orlando, blood is thicker than pride, or the desire for prestige – at least among the honorable. 

Quote #6

ADAM
But do not so. I have five hundred crowns,
The thrifty hire I sav'd under your father,
Which I did store to be my foster-nurse,
When service should in my old limbs lie lame,
And unregarded age in corners thrown.
Take that, and He that doth the ravens feed,
Yea, providently caters for the sparrow,
Be comfort to my age! Here is the gold;
All this I give you. Let me be your servant;
Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty;
For in my youth I never did apply
Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood,
Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo
The means of weakness and debility;
Therefore my age is as a lusty winter,
Frosty, but kindly. Let me go with you;
I'll do the service of a younger man
In all your business and necessities. (2.3.4)

Why does Adam give up his entire life savings to help save Orlando's life?  Is it because he's a super-loyal servant?  Is it because Adam loves Orlando like a son?  Some combination of both, or something else entirely?  Before you answer this question, think about how Orlando treats Adam, especially when Orlando cares for him when the old servant is on the verge of starvation in Act 2, Scene 7.  It seems to us that Orlando behaves like a loyal son taking care of an aging parent.

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