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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

  

by Benjamin Franklin

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin Religion Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Part.Paragraph)

Quote #10

My being many Years in the Assembly, the Majority of which were constantly Quakers, gave me frequent Opportunities of seeing the Embarrassment given them by their Principle against War, whenever Application was made to them by Order of the Crown to grant Aids for military Purposes. (3.39)

Here we come against one reason why Franklin may react so strongly against forms of organized religion: he disagrees with how aspects of some faith systems can interfere with what he sees as necessary life needs. Because Quakers are pacifists, it's against their beliefs to vote for or support military offenses or militia preparation. While Franklin values their right to their beliefs, he stresses the impracticality of pacifism in a situation like the colonists' during the French and Indian War, when not preparing properly for battle could lead to all their deaths.

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