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The Bacchae

The Bacchae

  

by Euripides

Analysis: Writing Style

Modern

Euripides' style is often said to be much more "modern" than Aeschylus or Sophocles, the other great tragedians. This is because his dialogue often sounds almost conversational, much like modern realism. His characters speak in way that's a lot more like everyday speech than in most other Greek tragedies. This is definitely true in The Bacchae. Sure the play still uses heightened language and was composed in verse, but in comparison to his contemporaries, Euripides was a totally modern kind of guy.

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