Bernice Bobs Her Hair
Bernice Bobs Her Hair
by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Romantic

Character Role Analysis

Warren

The rather one-dimensional Warren serves nicely as both romantic interest and object of jealousy. Since we don't know that much about him, we focus on what he does to the characters – and to the plot. In the beginning, Warren carries a torch for Marjorie and no one but Marjorie; she's used to stringing him along, and even though she definitely isn't in love with him, she's quite fond of him. However, this familiar relationship is disturbed by Bernice's relationship with him. All of a sudden, Warren isn't that into Marjorie at all, and she gets jealous. This is a classic example of the old adage that "You only want what you can't have" – once Warren is no longer accessible to Marjorie, she wants him back. The problem is, Bernice actually likes him. In the end, her feelings for him contribute to her decision to go through with the Big Chop.


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