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Quotes

Quote #1

He had devoted himself, however, too unreservedly to scientific studies ever to be weaned from them by any second passion. (1)

What does this tell us, then, about the nature of Aylmer's feelings for his wife?

Quote #2

His love for his young wife might prove the stronger of the two; but it could only be by intertwining itself with his love of science, and uniting the strength of the latter to his own. (1)

Perhaps this is the reason that Aylmer attempts to remove his wife's birthmark; not because of an obsession with perfection, but because in this way he can unite his love for his wife with his love for science into one obsessive project.

Quote #3

Such a union accordingly took place, and was attended with truly remarkable consequences and a deeply impressive moral. (2)

This is an interest line because the word "union" takes on multiple meanings. On one level, the word refers to the marriage between Aylmer and Georgiana. But on another level, this is the union of Aylmer's love for science and for his wife, as suggested by the preceding paragraph.

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