Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Technique

Much like their music, the Ramones' songwriting was uncomplicated and utilitarian. For one thing, there is only so much that you can say in a two-minute song. Despite this lack of complexity, the Ramones' practical style of songwriting served them quite well. Most Ramones lyrics tend to be pretty ambiguous, and "Blitzkrieg Bop" is no different. It's hard to know just what Joey Ramone is really singing about in this song. And the fact that there are so few lyrics in this song does not help the listener in figuring it out. But that's okay. There is not all that much going on in the Ramones' songwriting here... and that's precisely how they wanted it. Can anybody really imagine any member of the Ramones laboring over their lyrics deep into the night? Not really. The Ramones songwriting was intentionally minimalistic. Sure, there is a bit of rhyming going on, as in the second verse with "seat," "heat," and "beat." Otherwise, there's just not all that much to see here.

That said, Joey does create some nice imagery describing the experience of being young. The lyrics in the first and second verses seem like they could be about the four Ramones in their youth and the way they experienced music. The four members of the Ramones would have had to "pile in the back seat" in order to make the trek from Queens to Manhattan to see a band like the New York Dolls perform. Or it could just as likely be about the kids that went to the Ramones shows at CBGB's in New York City. The lyrics describe the experience of going to a club or music venue to see a band that you love. Joey captures the excitement, the tension, and the release that comes with this experience. As he explains in the first and second verses, "they're forming in a straight line" and "piling in the back seat" in order to get to the show. "The kids are losing their minds" out of excitement. While this may be rather uncomplicated songwriting, it does perfectly capture the anxiety and the joy that comes with being young and being excited to see your favorite band perform.

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