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Quotes

Quote #4

Though his dignity was sorely hurt by thus being made a draught animal, he was too wise to rebel. (2.5)

Buck sometimes has to swallow his pride for practical reasons.

Quote #5

It was inevitable that the clash for leadership should come. Buck wanted it. He wanted it because it was his nature, because he had been gripped tight by that nameless, incomprehensible pride of the trail and trace--that pride which holds dogs in the toil to the last gasp, which lures them to die joyfully in the harness, and breaks their hearts if they are cut out of the harness. This was the pride of Dave as wheel-dog, of Sol-leks as he pulled with all his strength; the pride that laid hold of them at break of camp, transforming them from sour and sullen brutes into straining, eager, ambitious creatures; the pride that spurred them on all day and dropped them at pitch of camp at night, letting them fall back into gloomy unrest and uncontent. This was the pride that bore up Spitz and made him thrash the sled-dogs who blundered and shirked in the traces or hid away at harness-up time in the morning. Likewise it was this pride that made him fear Buck as a possible lead-dog. And this was Buck's pride, too. (3.23)

Buck’s desire to become leader is tied together with his pride. He is used to being in control and in the lead, so he naturally wants as much in his new environment. This clash of pride sparks his fight with Spitz.

Quote #6

Buck did not like it, but he bore up well to the work, taking pride in it after the manner of Dave and Sol-leks, and seeing that his mates, whether they prided in it or not, did their fair share. (4.22)

Doing his share of the work pulling is a matter of pride for Buck – he learns this from the other dogs.

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