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The Call of the Wild

The Call of the Wild

by Jack London

Primitivity Quotes Page 3

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #7

And not only did he learn by experience, but instincts long dead became alive again. The domesticated generations fell from him. In vague ways he remembered back to the youth of the breed, to the time the wild dogs ranged in packs through the primeval forest and killed their meat as they ran it down. It was no task for him to learn to fight with cut and slash and the quick wolf snap. In this manner had fought forgotten ancestors. They quickened the old life within him, and the old tricks which they had stamped into the heredity of the breed were his tricks. They came to him without effort or discovery, as though they had been his always. And when, on the still cold nights, he pointed his nose at a star and howled long and wolflike, it was his ancestors, dead and dust, pointing nose at star and howling down through the centuries and through him. And his cadences were their cadences, the cadences which voiced their woe and what to them was the meaning of the stiffness, and the cold, and dark. (2.25)

Buck is not just an individual, but also a part of a long and communal history. He is the sum of all dogs that came before him and all that will come after.

Quote #8

The dominant primordial beast was strong in Buck, and under the fierce conditions of trail life it grew and grew. (3.1)

As Buck adapts to his new life, his primitive side becomes more prominent.

Quote #9

And strange Buck was to him, for of the many Southland dogs he had known, not one had shown up worthily in camp and on trail. They were all too soft, dying under the toil, the frost, and starvation. Buck was the exception. He alone endured and prospered, matching the husky in strength, savagery, and cunning. Then he was a masterful dog, and what made him dangerous was the fact that the club of the man in the red sweater had knocked all blind pluck and rashness out of his desire for mastery. He was preeminently cunning, and could bide his time with a patience that was nothing less than primitive. (3.22)

It is Buck’s primitive nature that allows him to survive in the frozen North where others of his kind have failed.

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