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Candide

Candide

by Voltaire

Religion Theme

Religion is one of the central targets of Voltaire’s mockery. Outside of the fantasy world of El Dorado, religion is consistently depicted as corrupting and morally bankrupt. Religious figures in Candide, such as the Protestant minister, the Inquisitor, and the Jesuit Baron are often self-righteous and less inclined to charity than their secular counterparts. The one exception to Voltaire’s satire is James the Anabaptist. This stems from the fact that the Anabaptists were highly unpopular and persecuted at the time of Voltaire’s writing.

Questions About Religion

  1. How is James the Anabaptist different from other religious figures in the novel?
  2. How does the religious structure in El Dorado measure up to the realities of the rest of the world?
  3. How and to what extent does religion impact Candide and his pursuit of Cunégonde?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

The nonexistence of religious practice in Candide, despite the prevalence of religious institutions and officials, suggests a disparity between the professed and real roles of religion.

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