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Candide

Candide

  

by Voltaire

Candide Suffering Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Chapter.Paragraph) We used the translation found on Project Gutenberg.

Quote #7

"We are going into another world," said Candide; "and surely it must be there that all is for the best. For I must confess there is reason to complain a little of what passeth in our world in regard to both natural and moral philosophy." (10.9)

Despite massive evidence to the contrary, Candide expects everything that happens will be for the best in Latin America.

Quote #8

"I have seen the worst," Candide replied. "But a wise man, who since has had the misfortune to be hanged, taught me that all is marvelously well; these are but the shadows on a beautiful picture."

"Your hanged man mocked the world," said Martin. "The shadows are horrible blots." (22.50)

Candide persists in believing in philosophy’s validity despite evidence to the contrary.

Quote #9

"You see," said Candide to Martin on the way, "we supped with six dethroned kings, and of those six there was one to whom I gave charity. Perhaps there are many other princes yet more unfortunate. For my part, I have only lost a hundred sheep; and now I am flying into Cunegonde's arms. My dear Martin, yet once more Pangloss was right: all is for the best." (27.2)

Candide interprets every positive occurrence as proof of the validity of Optimism.

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