From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Canto I

Canto I

  

by Ezra Pound

Canto I Loyalty Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Line)

Quote #4

For sacrifice, heaping the pyre with goods,
A sheep to Tiresias only, black and a bell-sheep. (26-27)

If Odysseus is going to get help from the dead prophet Tiresias, he's going to have to do something to show his devotion and loyalty to the dude. So to do this, Odysseus takes the best sheep in his entire flock (the bell-sheep) and totally kills and burns it, leaving nothing that he could possibly eat or put to use.

Quote #5

Lie quiet, Divus. I mean, that is Andreas Divus, (68)

The Andreas Divus guy Pound is talking about here isn't actually a character in Homer's Odyssey, but a dude who translated the Odyssey back in 1535. When Pound tells Divus to lie quiet, he might be saying that the dead spirit of Divus doesn't need to worry, because Pound's "Canto I" has been loyal to his (Divus') original translation.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement