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Brain Surgeon

Physical Danger

There's less danger for you than for the people you're operating on, that's for sure. However, there are long-term consequences that you'll need to keep an eye out for. Spending all day on your feet can lead to back problems, and working irregular hours and being stressed a lot isn't exactly a recipe for Zen.

 
If what they say about healthy minds working best in healthy bodies is true, this guy must be a genius. (Source)

Ironically, even though you're a doctor, you may gain weight and suffer heart disease or diabetes. Many surgeons have been observed to gain a substantial amount of body fat during the course of their career, probably due to a combination of long hours at the office or hospital (which means there's not much time to exercise) and the break room always having Oreos (which are delicious). If you go into this career, you may want to invest in a Shake Weight. We don't advise using it during surgery, however.

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