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Paleontologist

Physical Danger

 
My claws feel dull. Come and have a...look at them. (Source)

Thankfully, most of these dangerous killers have been dead for millions of years. Did you really think a velociraptor would come out of the ground and use your face to sharpen its talons?

In reality, they're all still extinct—at least as far as we know. Given all that, how dangerous is this paleontologist gig? Well, you're almost guaranteed to be digging in the hot sun for hours on end at some point. There's a chance you'll develop an impressive second-degree sunburn, not to mention a nice case of dehydration.

On the other hand, you might find yourself chipping away at slime-covered rocks in some dark, dank cave, with all sorts of nasty creatures lurking in the depths. You've barely got room to turn around much less hightail it out of there at the first sign of trouble. And did we mention this whole exercise has given you a fully-developed case of claustrophobia?

On the bright side, this is probably the only profession where the several-tons-heavy carnivores you work with all day can only cause physical damage by falling on you.

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