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Stress

It's no day at the beach preventing crime and helping people adjust to society. In fact, many officers feel somewhat responsible when a parolee in their care acts out against society. Because community programs are getting slashed in the wake of the recession, there is not enough help for those getting out of prison. Without help, a large portion of offenders go back to doing whatever got them thrown in jail in the first place. You can beat yourself up over it, but just keep in mind that you weren't the one who raised them.

Furthermore, large caseloads, piles of paperwork, deadlines, work-related violence, and threats from offenders contribute to early career burnout. A large percentage of parole officers are frustrated by the low pay and lack of career advancement. To help alleviate stress, certain agencies are providing stress relief programs for their parole officers. Unfortunately, not every agency can afford to help parole officers relieve their stress. Do you know how much it costs to invest in a decent punching bag these days?

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