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Analysis

Literary Devices in Chomp

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Setting

Can you imagine living in a zoo? That is what life is like for Wahoo Cray who wakes up every day to, "gators, snakes, parrots, mynah birds, rats, mice, monkeys, raccoons, tortoises and even a bald...

Narrator Point of View

Chomp is told in the third person, and we can see into the minds of our main characters, even some minor ones. The narrator has the power to move us back and forth between scenes, showing us the ex...

Genre

Chomp is young adult literature because the main character, Wahoo, is a teenager. The book is mainly from his perspective, and in this way the book is oriented toward older children and teens. Not...

Tone

Hiaasen's tone is generally matter-of-fact. This book is a straight-forward adventure without much to interpret. Take Mickey's snide comments for example: "What a poser," Mickey said."Chill out, Po...

Writing Style

Besides the odd fifty-dollar word thrown in here and there—like denizens—Hiaasen keeps it simple. His writing style is uncomplicated and conversational, which makes this book a very quick read....

What's Up With the Title?

Chomp is a common phrase in this book: It is what happens to each main character when they meet up with the reality of their situations. For example, Wahoo gets chomped by Alice when he is showing...

What's Up With the Ending?

The book ends with Tuna, but let's back up a moment first: She is able to stand up to her father now that his arms are tied, and she stuffs a nasty sock into his mouth after he says something total...

Tough-o-Meter

This story is super amusing, which makes it a pretty fast read. It has some difficult words thrown in, though—words that the average sixth grader wouldn't know (heck, your teacher might not know...

Plot Analysis

It's a Family AffairThe Crays are not your average family—they spend their time watching after wild animals, and make their living by keeping them tame on film for commercials and movies. After a...

Trivia

One of Carl Hiaasen's favorite books is The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger. (Source.) It's no wonder he's so good—Carl Hiaasen has been writing creatively since he was six years old. I...

Steaminess Rating

The heat between Wahoo and Tuna is basically just beginning to smoke a teeny bit. The only touching they do is hold hands once, and they mostly treat each other like good friends, talking about wha...

Allusions

The Crocodile Hunter, Steve Irwin (3.3)
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