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Circe's Power

Circe's Power

  

by Louise Glück

Circe's Power Love Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (line)

Quote #4

In the same breath,/ I foresaw your departure (15-16)

Hearken back to earlier lines in the poem, and recall how Circe tells Odysseus that she changed his men into swine in order to show him her "goodness" and her "power." She's like a double-sided coin, heads or tails. In this moment, we see another kind of coin appear – that of Circe's ability to see two very different things. She sees both her happiness and her unhappiness. She sees both her and Odysseus living together, and she sees them split apart.

Quote #5

My friend,/ every sorceress is/ a pragmatist at heart; (19-21)

What does it mean to be a pragmatist, and why isn't it natural for us to assume that sorceresses are pragmatists? What is Circe trying to communicate to Odysseus in this moment?

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