From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
When I Consider How My Light is Spent (On His Blindness)

When I Consider How My Light is Spent (On His Blindness)

  

by John Milton

When I Consider How My Light is Spent (On His Blindness) Principles Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (line)

Quote #1

though my Soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker(lines 4-5)

The speaker claims that the desire for service is built into his constitution. His "Maker" is like a magnet that attracts his soul.

Quote #2

"Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?" (line 9)

The speaker questions God's principles. Would God ask for the impossible? What would be the point of that? Think of "day-labour" as being like physical work that would require light.

Quote #3

But patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies, "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts; (lines 8-10)

Patience says that the speaker has God's principles all wrong. What this really means is that the speaker is correcting himself, because "patience" is one of his principles. All this virtue stuff can get confusing.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement