© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention

 Table of Contents

Constitutional Convention Learning Guide: Citations

Sources we cite in Constitutional Convention

1 The United States Supreme Court, in Morse et al. v. Frederick, 551 U.S. ___ (2007); For the "Tinker" case, see The United States Supreme Court, in Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School Dist., 393 U.S. 503 (1969).
2 George Washington, quoted in George Brown Tindall and David Emory Shi, America: A Narrative History, fifth ed. (New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1999), 325.
3 See "Is It True?," Jefferson's Blood, PBS Frontline, dir. Thomas Lennon, originally broadcast 2 May 2000, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/jefferson/true/, accessed 20 August 2007.
4 Peter H. Lindert, " Distribution of household wealth: 1774-1998," Table Be39-46, Historical Statistics of the United States: Millennial Edition, ed. Susan Carter, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Michael Haines, Alan Olmsted, Richard Sutch and Gavin Wright (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), http://hsus.cambridge.org/, accessed 5 January 2009.
5 David Bernstein, "The Constitutional Convention: Facts and Figures" (in The Craft of Teaching), The History Teacher 21:1 (Nov., 1987), 13.
6 Jack N. Rakove, Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution (New York: Knopf, 1996).
7 Michael R. Haines, " Population, by region and urban-rural residence: 1790-1990," Table Aa36-92, Historical Statistics of the United States: Millennial Edition, ed. Susan Carter, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Michael Haines, Alan Olmsted, Richard Sutch and Gavin Wright (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), http://hsus.cambridge.org/, accessed 5 January 2009. NB: In censuses prior to 1950, the urban population comprised all persons living in incorporated places of 2,500 or more and areas (usually minor civil divisions) classified as urban under special rules relating to population size and density.
8 John J. McCusker, "Nationality of the white population, by state or locality—percentage distribution: 1790," Table Eg65-84, Historical Statistics of the United States: Millennial Edition, ed. Susan Carter, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Michael Haines, Alan Olmsted, Richard Sutch and Gavin Wright (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), http://hsus.cambridge.org/, accessed 5 January 2009.
9 Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation (New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2000), 9.
10 Paul Finkelman, "James Madison and the Bill of Rights: A Reluctant Paternity," The Supreme Court Review, Vol. 1990. (1990), pp. 303-304.
11 A Yale Law School study on conservative and liberal justices in relation to decisions invalidating congressional laws, as well as the expression "fostering democratic participation to achieve democratic rule," can be found in Nina Totenberg, "Justice Breyer: The Case Against 'Originalists,'" Morning Edition, National Public Radio, 30 September 2005, http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4930456, accessed 17 September 2007. See also Stephen Breyer, Active Liberty: Interpreting Our Democratic Constitution (New York: Knopf, 2005).
12 Thomas Jefferson, quoted in David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in The Age of Revolution, 1770-1823 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975), 176
13 David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in The Age of Revolution, 1770-1823 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975), 128-9, fn33.
14 Thomas Jefferson, "Query XVIII: Manners," in Notes on the State of Virginia (1787; New York: Bedford St. Martin's, 2002), 195.
15 David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in The Age of Revolution, 1770-1823 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1975), 176.
16 Jefferson finally did realize this horrifying possibility in the midst of the Missouri crisis of 1820, when he wrote to his friend John Holmes that "this momentous question [the future of slavery], like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror." Thomas Jefferson to John Holmes, 22 April 1820, reprinted in Ray Allen Billington, The Making of American Democracy: Readings and Documents (New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1962), 249
17 Leonard L. Richards, The Slave Power: The Free North and Southern Domination, 1780-1860 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2000), 55-57
18 Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation (New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2000), 52.
19 Roger A. Bruns, Introduction, A More Perfect Union: The Creation of the United States Constitution (Washington, DC: Published for the National Archives and Records Administration by the National Archives Trust Fund Board, 1986).
20 John Fiske, The Critical Period of American History: 1783-1789 (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 224-5.
21 John Fiske, The Critical Period of American History: 1783-1789 (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 225; Carol Berkin, A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution (New York: Harcourt, 2002), 222-223.
22 Roger A. Bruns, Introduction, A More Perfect Union: The Creation of the United States Constitution (Washington, DC: Published for the National Archives and Records Administration by the National Archives Trust Fund Board, 1986).
23 Carol Berkin, A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution (New York: Harcourt, 2002), 131.
24 Jack N. Rakove, Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution (New York: Knopf, 1996).

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement