* Site-Outage Notice: Our engineering elves will be tweaking the Shmoop site from Monday, December 22 10:00 PM PST to Tuesday, December 23 5:00 AM PST. The site will be unavailable during this time.
Dismiss
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by Alexandre Dumas

Hatred Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

"As for me, when I see a bright spark of hatred shining in the eye of an accused man, I feel encouraged, I rejoice: it is no longer a trial, but a duel. I go for him, he ripostes, I press harder, and the fight ends, like all fights, in victory or defeat. That is what advocacy means." (6.43)

It seems strange that something as irrational as hatred should enter into the justice system.

Quote #2

He decided it was human hatred and not divine vengeance that had plunged him into this abyss. He doomed these unknown men to every torment that his inflamed imagination could devise, while still considering that the most frightful were too mild and, above all, too brief for them: torture was followed by death, and death brought, if not repose, at least an insensibility that resembled it. (15.8)

There's something deeply unsettling about that phrase "human hatred." You can really feel for Edmond, feel his pain and his thirst for revenge just reading it.

Quote #3

"If you wish to find the guilty party, first discover whose interests the crime serves! Whose interests might be served by your disappearance?" (17.57)

Abbé Faria succinctly explains the origins of much envy and discord.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Noodle's College Search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement