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Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Crime and Punishment Part 2, Chapter 2 Summary

  • Thinking that the cops are already searching his room, Raskolnikov arrives home.
  • Whew. Nobody has been in there.
  • He quickly gathers together the eight items he hid in the hole: some jewelry, a medal, a few things wrapped in paper. He doesn't examine them too closely, just puts them, and the (bloody) purse in his pockets and heads on out.
  • He plans to throw them in the canal, but there are too many people around.
  • After coming up with several alternative plans for getting rid of the stuff, he happens on an abandoned yard, with trash in it.
  • He hides everything under a big rock, and then takes off, sure it's the ultimate hiding place.
  • Raskolnikov wanders, his mind a mess, and then wonders why he wanted to throw everything away, into the water. And why hadn't he even looked in the purse?
  • He blames his confusion on being sick.
  • Soon Raskolnikov finds himself again going toward his friend Razumihin's place, and wonders why he's so compelled to go there.
  • He goes up and Razumihin is writing, and greets Raskolnikov in his pajamas.
  • Surprised at Raskolnikov's raggedy clothes and wild looks, Razumihin comments on his sorry state. Then, realizing his friend is sick, comments on that.
  • Raskolnikov denies being "delirious," and babbles confusedly about wanting a teaching job, and then decides he doesn't want to hang out with Razumihin. He says "Good-bye," and starts to leave.
  • Razumihin tries to stop him, telling him not to be so weird.
  • Razumihin says that he's not teaching either, but getting paid to do translations. He needs help, and offers Raskolnikov a few pages to translate, and three roubles.
  • Our boy takes the money and the pages and then leaves, and then comes back and returns the money and the pages.
  • Razumihin tries to communicate with Raskolnikov, but it's no use, he's gone.
  • In his confused, muttering state, Raskolnikov almost gets trampled by a horse, near the Neva river, but is saved when the driver whips him across the back.
  • Then the driver accuses him of being a drunken bum, trying to get hurt so he could sue for damages. Then a lady and a little girl give him twenty copecks, out of pity.
  • He walks on and sees the beauty of the Neva, marvels at the cathedral. He's in deep mental confusion, and he throws the money in the river, thinking that he has now completely isolated himself from his former life and the people in it.
  • In all, he wanders some six hours, then gets home in the late afternoon.
  • At sunset, he hears screaming and violence and wakes up.
  • It's Ilya Petrovitch, the cop from the police station. He's beating the landlady, yelling at her. All kinds of commotion and noise is happening.
  • Raskolnikov wants to do something, but can't move. Finally, Ilya seems to vanish.
  • Terrified, like never before, Raskolnikov huddles up in agony until Nastasya comes in with a candle and food.
  • He asks her why Ilya was abusing the landlady so horribly.
  • She tells him it never happened.
  • She says it's because he has noisy blood, and that it gets trapped in his ears and makes him hallucinate.
  • Raskolnikov asks for water. Nastasya brings him some, and then he passes out.

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