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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Transformation Quotes Page 2

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

He was as puzzled as any one else at the apparently advanced age of his mind and body at birth. He read up on it in the medical journal, but found that no such case had been previously recorded. At his father's urging he made an honest attempt to play with other boys, and frequently he joined in the milder games – football shook him up too much, and he feared that in case of a fracture his ancient bones would refuse to knit. (1.3.9)

Part of creating a fantasy has to do with establishing the ground rules for how fantastical things work. Fitzgerald makes it clear that Benjamin’s peculiarity of age extends to his mind, personality, and body.

Quote #5

By the time he was twelve years old his parents had grown used to him. Indeed, so strong is the force of custom that they no longer felt that he was different from any other child – except when some curious anomaly reminded them of the fact. But one day a few weeks after his twelfth birthday, while looking in the mirror, Benjamin made, or thought he made, an astonishing discovery. Did his eyes deceive him, or had his hair turned in the dozen years of his life from white to iron-gray under its concealing dye? Was the network of wrinkles on his face becoming less pronounced? Was his skin healthier and firmer, with even a touch of ruddy winter colour? He could not tell. He knew that he no longer stooped, and that his physical condition had improved since the early days of his life. (1.3.11)

What non-physical changes accompany this physical transformation in Benjamin?

Quote #6

They pulled up behind a handsome brougham whose passengers were disembarking at the door. A lady got out, then an elderly gentleman, then another young lady, beautiful as sin. Benjamin started; an almost chemical change seemed to dissolve and recompose the very elements of his body. A rigour passed over him, blood rose into his cheeks, his forehead, and there was a steady thumping in his ears. It was first love. (1.5.6)

Look at the physical changes that accompany this emotional reaction in Benjamin. Again, the story makes a connection between the state of the body and the state of the mind or spirit.

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