© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Cyrano de Bergerac

Cyrano de Bergerac

by Edmond Rostand

Versions of Reality Quotes Page 4

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #10

CYRANO
Captain?
CARBON
Our troop being all present, be so kind
As to present them to the Comte de Guiche!
CYRANO
The Cadets of Gascoyne – the defenders
Of Carbon de Castel-Jaloux:
Free fighters, free lovers, free spenders –
The Cadets of Gascoyne – the defenders
Of old homes, old names, and old splendors –
A proud and a pestilent crew!
The Cadets of Gascoyne, the defenders
Of Carbon de Castel-Jaloux.

Hawk eyed, they stare down all contenders –
The wolf bares his fangs as they do –
Make way there, you fat money-lenders!
(Hawk eyed, they stare down all contenders)
Old boots that have been to the menders,
Old cloaks that are worn through and through –
Hawk eyed, they stare down all contenders! –
The wolf bares his fangs as they do!

Skull-breakers they are, and sword-benders;
Red blood is their favorite brew;
Hot haters and loyal befrienders,
Skull-breakers they are, and sword-benders.
Wherever a quarrel engenders,
They’re read and waiting for you!
Skull-breakers they are, and sword-benders;
Red blood is their favorite brew!

Behold them, our Gascon defenders
Who win every woman they woo!
There’s never a dame but surrenders –
Behold them, our Gascon defenders!
Young wives who are clever pretenders –
Old husbands who house the cuckoo –
Behold them – our Gascon defenders
Who win every woman they woo! (II. 296-329)

This whole scene has an aura of artifice in it because Cyrano makes up a perfectly rhymed song in the moment. Again, even the most impromptu of moments seem overblown and scripted in the "reality" we see up onstage.

Quote #11

CYRANO
I marched on, all alone
To meet those devils. Overhead, the moon
Hung like a gold watch at the fob of heaven,
Till suddenly some Angel rubbed a cloud,
As it might be his handkerchief, across
The shining crystal, and – the night came down.
No lamps in those back streets – It was so dark – (II.483-489)

Cyrano’s recounting of his adventures of the night before is presented in overwrought poetical language. Perhaps this is part of the reason why Christian begins to insult Cyrano so doggedly; he is sick of hearing such pretentious stories lionized.

Quote #12

CYRANO (passionately, moves nearer.)
How should it be?
I have another voice – my own,
Myself, daring –
(he stops, confused; then tries to recover himself.)
Where was I?...I forget!...
Forgive me. This is all sweet like a dream…
Strange – like a dream…
ROXANE
How, strange? (III. 263 – 268)

Cyrano’s passion is so feverish that he feels as if he is living a dream. This whole passage evokes a languid and surreal feeling that renders it decidedly unrealistic.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement