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Daedalus

Daedalus

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Home Mythology Daedalus Cliques Auto Club & Woodshop

Daedalus's Clique: Auto Club & Woodshop

Daedalus is one of the big stars of this clique. All the guys who like to fix cars and build stuff get a little jealous of Daedalus' mad skills. Not only can he fix a truck with a busted carburetor, he can even make the old hunk of junk fly. Not too shabby, if you ask us.

Hephaestus

Hephaestus is the dude of dudes to the Auto Club/Woodshop crew. Like Daedalus and the rest of his mechanically gifted buddies, Hephaestus loves to get his hands dirty. He's the Greek god of blacksmiths and technology, so he's never happier than when he's putting something together or pulling something apart to find out how it works. FYI: Hephaestus has just started a petition to get blacksmithing back in schools. He's sure that the youth of today are totally missing out on this lost art form. What do you say? Want to sign?

Kothar

Kothar is a Semitic god, who, like Hephaestus, is supposed to be a top-notch smith and craftsman of all kinds. A few of his more famous feats were crafting a bow for the mortal Aquat, building a fabulous palace for the warrior god Baal, and making two magical clubs for Baal, with which the warrior god defeated his enemy Yamm.

Ptah

The Egyptian god Ptah is associated with stonemasons, so just like Daedalus, he was a wiz with a hammer and chisel. Since a ton of the stone chiseling that went on in ancient Egypt was done to decorate tombs, Ptah was also associated with death and the afterlife.

Wayland the Smith

This legendary blacksmith pops up in Norse, Germanic, and Anglo-Saxon legends. Like Hephaestus, he was said to walk with a limp. Wayland was hamstrung by King Niðhad, who kidnapped him and forced him to forge things for him. The blacksmith got some serious revenge on the king, though, when he killed Niðhad's sons, made goblets out of their skulls, and tricked the king into drinking from the cups. (Yikes.)

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