© 2012 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Social Studies Online: Digital Literacy Connections to Civics and History
Social Studies Online: Digital Literacy Connections to Civics and History
Advertisement

Social Studies Online: Digital Literacy Connections to Civics and History Activity: To Speak or Not to Speak… Freely

Instructions for Your Students

What's Going on Today

Everyone agrees that the US Constitution protects free speech – at least, for the most part. You know you can't yell "Fire!" in a crowded theater, unless you're interested in some serious quality time with the po'lice. But the issue isn't always so cut and dried in our digital world.

Can you get in trouble for your Tweets, Facebook updates, and Tumblr pics under the law? Check out a real-life case about a high school student who Tweeted about her governor – and what happened after – and decide for yourself.

Instructions

When your instructor tells you, open the following links in your browser:

Twitter Tangle: Governor Apologizes to Student

Shmoop: Free Speech. The basics on the right to free speech.

Kansas School Unconstitutionally Disciplines Student For Criticizing Gov. Sam BrownbackAn opinionated blog post. The name says it all.

Teenager Emma Sullivan and Sam Brownback's insulting interlude. An opinion post claiming the issue isn't one of free speech.