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Quotes

Quote #4

[…] we recognized the features of Lucy Westenra. Lucy Westenra, but yet how changed. The sweetness was turned to adamantine, heartless cruelty, and the purity to voluptuous wantonness. (16.17)

Jack Seward can't believe how much "Lucy Westenra" has changed – he keeps repeating her full name, emphasizing that it's now just an empty label. "Lucy Westenra" is no longer herself; this over-sexed she-demon is not the girl he fell in love with. This vampire lady might be sexy, but she's sexy in a totally freaky way.

Quote #5

She still advanced, however, and with a languorous, voluptuous grace, said: –

'Come to me Arthur. Leave these others and come to me. My arms are hungry for you. Come, and we can rest together. Come, my husband, come!' (16.20-21)

Again, vampire Lucy is too sexually aggressive. In the world of Victorian England, that sexuality needs to be repressed!

Quote #6

Arthur placed the point over the heart, and as I looked I could see its dint in the white flesh. Then he struck with all his might. (16.44)

A lot of critics like to read this scene in Freudian terms as a kind of sex scene. Because Arthur is Lucy's fiancé, and he gets dibs on staking her, these critics interpret the stake as a stand-in for Arthur's penis. What do you think?

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