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Dragonwings

Dragonwings

by Laurence Yep

Analysis: Narrator Point of View

Who is the narrator, can she or he read minds, and, more importantly, can we trust her or him?

First Person (Central Narrator)

Moon Shadow proves to be an open and trustworthy narrator whose innocence and heart endear him to us as readers. We follow him as he grows from a kid to a teenager, from the Middle Kingdom to the Land of the Golden Mountain, from a fearful boy to a courageous young man. His youthful first-person perspective delivers the story to us through a the simple and honest lens. At the same time, the ability for a more mature Moon Shadow to interject and give us tidbits from the future offers a sense of assurance and reliability that his story is verified through multiple stages of his life and experience. So, even though Dragonwings deals with some weighty issues like racism, xenophobia, pride, and courage, Moon Shadow's point of view gives us a hand to hold, trusting that he'll explain things in a relatable way.

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