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Henry Ford in History of Drugs in America

Henry Ford (1863-1947) was one of America's greatest businessmen, the founder of Ford Motor Company and the man largely responsible for initiating the era of mass-consumption and mass-production in the American economy. Ford's innovative business practices, including standardization, the assembly line, and high wages for workers, revolutionized American industry.

In 1914, Ford argued against cigarette smoking by using an early version of the "gateway drug" theory. "Morphine," he wrote in a pamphlet titled The Little White Slaver, "is the legitimate consequence of alcohol, and alcohol is the legitimate consequence of tobacco. Cigarettes, drink, opium, is the logical and regular series."

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