The Eagle
The Eagle
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

The Eagle Summary

Look! Up there, on that steep, rocky cliff. Is that…an eagle? It is! Honey, get out the binoculars! Wow – the cliff is sharp and jagged, but the eagle can hold on to it, no sweat. His claws look like the hands of an old, ragged man.

The cliff is so high it looks closer to the sun than to the earth. Perched in such a high place, the eagle is surrounded by blue sky in a circle around him.

The sea also resembles an old man: it has wrinkles. The eagle is so high up that the waves like small, crisscrossing lines moving slowly toward shore.

This eagle does what eagles spend most of their time doing: looking around. Eagles have great eyes, and the craggy mountain cliff provides the perfect vantage point for seeing everything below.

Did you see that? Where'd he go? The eagle dove off the cliff so fast that he looked like a bolt of lightning. Maybe he spied something tasty to eat below, or maybe he just wanted to stretch his wings. Either way, he's too quick for our eyes to follow.

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