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Analysis


Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

If you haven’t read Orson Scott Card’s introduction to Ender's Game, you might take a look at it, if only for the part where Card says that he avoided all the literary tricks that make reading...

Setting

The setting of Ender's Game is really five places: North Carolina, Battle School, Fairyland/the End of the World, Command School, and the Colony. But first, let’s talk time.Here’s the one thing...

Narrator Point of View

Listen to this:Father and Mother said it, so often it made Valentine want to scream at them. It isn't the new Peter! It's the old Peter, only smarter!How smart? Smarter than you, Father. Smarter th...

Style

Ever notice that sometimes people use “simple” as a negative word? Like, you can imagine someone saying, “this book is simple,” and they really mean “this book isn’t very smart.” Well...

What's Up With the Title?

Let’s get the obvious answer out of the way: this book is called “Ender’s Game” because it’s primarily about a kid called Ender, who happens to spend most of his time playing games. So En...

What's Up With the Ending?

That is a very good question: what is up with this ending? Or, should we say: what’s up with all the different endings? You ever notice how some recent films seem to wrap things up…and then go...

Tough-o-Meter

This isn’t a book for children – just look at how much violence is in it, and the dirty language these kids use (everything is all “fart” and “your butt”). Oh, yeah, it’s chock-full o...
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