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Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451

  

by Ray Bradbury

Getting Naked in the River

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

(Click the symbolism infographic to download.)

We thought that would get your attention. When the chase draws to a close, Montag ditches his clothes, bathes in the river, and dons Faber’s attire instead. For a man who’s been through three or more identity crises, this is significant. He’s leaving the old Montag behind, cleansing himself of his old identity, and assimilating a new one for the time being (Faber’s). The fact that another man is captured and killed in Montag’s place is a great ancillary to this moment.

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