Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #1

"I'm still crazy. The rain feels good. I love to walk in it.

"I don't think I'd like that," he said.

"You might if you tried."

"I never have."

She licked her lips. "Rain even tastes good." (1.164-8)

Clarisse is a foil to Beatty; she represents nature while he stands for technology and modernization.

Quote #2

"Bet I know something else you don't. There's dew on the grass in the morning."

He suddenly couldn't remember if he had known this or not, and it made him quite irritable.

"And if you look"—she nodded at the sky—"there's a man in the moon."

He hadn't looked for a long time. (1.50-3)

Clarisse instigates Montag’s rebellion not by telling him what to think, but by inviting him to think.

Quote #3

Without turning on the light he imagined how this room would look. His wife stretched on the bed, uncovered and cold, like a body displayed on the lid of a tomb, her eyes fixed to the ceiling by invisible threads of steel, immovable. And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound, of music and talk and music and talk coming in, coming in on the shore of her unsleeping mind. The room was indeed empty. Every night the waves came in and bore her off on their great tides of sound, floating her, wide-eyed, toward morning. There had been no night in the last two years that Mildred had not swum that sea, had not gladly gone down in it for the third time. (1.76)

The fact that this listening device is called a "Seashell" is ironic – it’s far from natural, and is in fact an element of the machinery which opposes nature in this novel.

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