Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #7

With an effort, Montag reminded himself again that this was no fictional episode to be watched on his run to the river; it was in actuality his own chess game he was witnessing, move by move. (3.202)

Part of Montag's transformative epiphany has to do with finally accepting reality. He is forced to face the world as it truly exists –not as it is presented in television. That’s what happens here in this chase scene.

Quote #8

Then the lights switched back to the land, the helicopters swerved over the city again, as if they had picked up another trail. They were gone. The Hound was gone. Now there was only the cold river and Montag floating in a sudden peacefulness, away from the city and the lights and the chase, away from everything. (3.226)

Reaching the river means Montag is safe from the Mechanical Hound. In symbolic terms, nature trumps technology.

Quote #9

And there at the bottom of the hayloft stair, waiting for him, would be the incredible thing. He would step carefully down, in the pink light of early morning, so fully aware of the world that he would be afraid, and stand over the small miracle and at last bend to touch it.

A cool glass of fresh milk, and a few apples and pears laid at the foot of the steps.

This was all he wanted now. Some sign that the immense world would accept him and give him the long time needed to think all the things that must be thought.

A glass of milk, an apple, a pear. (3.242-5)

Having lived in, and now rejected, a scientific, technological world, it’s fitting that Montag’s desired haven is one of natural elements.

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