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The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber

The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber

  

by Ernest Hemingway

The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber Men and Masculinity Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

He had decided now that to break would be much easier. He would eat, then, by himself and could read a book with his meals. They would eat by themselves. He would see them through the safari on a very formal basis-what was it the French called it? Distinguished consideration-and it would be a damn sight easier than having to go through this emotional trash. (1.63)

Wilson is seriously reconsidering his interactions with his clients, and can you blame them? The Macombers bring more drama than a Shakespeare play. Plus, we can't forget: no matter whom he sleeps with or befriends, Wilson is in this for the money.

Quote #5

"I bolted like a rabbit," Macomber said.

Now what in hell were you going to do about a man who talked like that, Wilson wondered. (1.66-67)

Macomber's emotional honesty is seriously disturbing to Wilson. He would never admit to such feelings. Given that kind of confession, Wilson doesn't even know how to deal with Macomber. We wonder why he doesn't just tell the guy to buck up and move on.

Quote #6

Wilson looked at Macomber with his flat, blue, machinegunner's eyes and the other smiled back at him. (1.68)

Wilson has that sun-dried, seen-it-all, manly look. He embodies the gun-toting hunter, unlike Macomber, who looks like someone playing dress-up. The clothes don't make the man; the experience does.

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