Frankenstein
Frankenstein
by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein Chapter 12 Quotes Page 1

Page (1 of 2) Quotes:   1    2  
How we cite the quotes:
(chapter.paragraph)
Quote 1

I lay on my straw, but I could not sleep. I thought of the occurrences of the day. What chiefly struck me was the gentle manners of these people, and I longed to join them, but dared not. I remembered too well the treatment I had suffered the night before from the barbarous villagers, and resolved, whatever course of conduct I might hereafter think it right to pursue, that for the present I would remain quietly in my hovel, watching and endeavouring to discover the motives which influenced their actions. (12.1)

The "motive" behind the way the cottagers treat each other is—family. They're nice to each other because they're related. (Incidentally, "Because they're family" is also the excuse for a lot of not-so-nice behavior.)

Quote 2

I had admired the perfect forms of my cottagers—their grace, beauty, and delicate complexions; but how was I terrified when I viewed myself in a transparent pool! At first I started back, unable to believe that it was indeed I who was reflected in the mirror; and when I became fully convinced that I was in reality the monster that I am, I was filled with the bitterest sensations of despondence and mortification. Alas! I did not yet entirely know the fatal effects of this miserable deformity. (12.13)

Aw. The monster is totally the unloved middle sibling. We feel you, monster.

Quote 3

My thoughts now became more active, and I longed to discover the motives and feelings of these lovely creatures; I was inquisitive to know why Felix appeared so miserable and Agatha so sad. I thought (foolish wretch!) that it might be in my power to restore happiness to these deserving people. When I slept or was absent, the forms of the venerable blind father, the gentle Agatha, and the excellent Felix flitted before me. I looked upon them as superior beings who would be the arbiters of my future destiny. I formed in my imagination a thousand pictures of presenting myself to them, and their reception of me. I imagined that they would be disgusted, until, by my gentle demeanour and conciliating words, I should first win their favour and afterwards their love. (12.17)

The monster’s desire for love and familial affection makes him a deeply human and sympathetic character. Yet it also drives him to commit his immoral acts.

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