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Frankenstein

Frankenstein

  

by Mary Shelley

 Table of Contents

Frankenstein Chapter 9 Quotes

How we cite the quotes:
(chapter.paragraph)

When I reflected on his crimes and malice, my hatred and revenge burst all bounds of moderation. I would have made a pilgrimage to the highest peak of the Andes, could I when there have precipitated him to their base. (9.6)

Okay, but question: is there such a thing as "moderate" revenge? Is revenge an emotion that you can even feel moderately—like, wanting a little revenge?

I, not in deed, but in effect, was the true murderer. Elizabeth read my anguish in my countenance, and kindly taking my hand, said, "My dearest friend, you must calm yourself. These events have affected me, God knows how deeply; but I am not so wretched as you are. There is an expression of despair, and sometimes of revenge, in your countenance that makes me tremble. Dear Victor, banish these dark passions. Remember the friends around you, who centre all their hopes in you. Have we lost the power of rendering you happy? Ah! While we love, while we are true to each other, here in this land of peace and beauty, your native country, we may reap every tranquil blessing--what can disturb our peace?" (9.8)

Victor’s guilt due to the deaths of William and Justine causes him to seek revenge against the monster.

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Quote 3

Elizabeth read my anguish in my countenance, and kindly taking my hand, said, "My dearest friend, you must calm yourself. These events have affected me, God knows how deeply; but I am not so wretched as you are. There is an expression of despair, and sometimes of revenge, in your countenance that makes me tremble. Dear Victor, banish these dark passions. Remember the friends around you, who centre all their hopes in you. Have we lost the power of rendering you happy? Ah! While we love, while we are true to each other, here in this land of peace and beauty, your native country, we may reap every tranquil blessing—what can disturb our peace?" (9.8)

For a novel about creating life, Frankenstein doesn't talk much about religion. Here, though, we get a glimpse of an alternative moral structure: Christianity, which is all about turning the other cheek and avoiding revenge. Would the novel have turned out differently if Victor had listened?

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