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Free Speech

Free Speech

Home Civics Free Speech Teaching Current Events & Pop Culture

Current Events & Pop Culture

Available to teachers only as part of the Teaching Free Speech Teacher Pass


Teaching Free Speech Teacher Pass includes:

  • Assignments & Activities
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  • Current Events & Pop Culture articles
  • Discussion & Essay Questions
  • Challenges & Opportunities
  • Related Readings in Literature & History

Sample of Current Events & Pop Culture


An editorial published in the New York Times in February 2010 argues that the anti-terrorism Humanitarian Law Project may conflict with the constitutional right to freedom of speech. The piece provides an illuminating example of the tensions that have arisen over protecting civil liberties while pursuing counter-terrorism.

An editorial published in the New York Times in February 2010 argues that the anti-terrorism Humanitarian Law Project may conflict with the constitutional right to freedom of speech. The piece provides an illuminating example of the tensions that have arisen over protecting civil liberties while pursuing counter-terrorism.


Excerpt

“The law prohibits giving not only weapons and money, but also less concrete support, like advice and “service.” The plaintiffs argue that these prohibitions go too far, infringing on their rights to free speech and association. Supporters of the law argue that it reasonably seeks to put groups like Al Qaeda and Hamas off-limits and to prohibit people from working with them.”