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James Wolfe (1727-1759), a colonel in the British Army, led the successful attack against Quebec in 1759, all but ending the French and Indian War. Born into a military family, he joined the army at age 14, and saw combat at 16. Posted to North America in 1757, he was given the local rank of "Brigadier in America" in 1758 and assigned the task of capturing Quebec, the most secure French position in North America.

Wolfe's risky decision to attack the western side of the city by scaling the poorly defended cliffs along the Saint Lawrence River caught the French by surprise. Forced to abandon the security of the city walls, the less disciplined French forces were quickly defeated. In the battle, Wolfe received injuries to his wrist and chest, and died on the battlefield. He subsequently became a British national hero.

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