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Frigg

Frigg

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Home Mythology Frigg Cliques Student Council

Frigg's Clique: Student Council

Frigg isn't just on the student council: she’s the president. That’s because Frigg’s the type who takes charge. As Odin’s wife, who also keeps her own permanent residence, this goddess of home management is technically in charge of three rather busy households. As mistress of these homes, it’s her job to plan parties, manage day-to-day operations, and command an army of servants – no small task. Plus, she also plays a leadership role among the gods and goddesses of Asgard: when Balder’s plagued by nightmares of his impending death, it’s Frigg who steps forward to administer the oath not to harm him.

Hera (Juno)

The Greco-Roman goddess Hera is another powerful woman who’s married to a king. This jealous wife of Zeus spends a lot of time obsessing about his extramarital affairs. But when she’s not plotting a way to destroy one of Zeus’ mistresses, she likes to micro-manage the affairs of mortals, trying to help the Greeks win the Trojan War, for example. Like Frigg, one of Hera’s official roles is as the goddess of marriage.

Vesta (Hestia)

This sister of Hera was the Greco-Romanic goddess of the hearth, home, and domesticity. Keeping a fire burning in the hearth was an important way to honor her, and Greeks and Romans did not allow their hearth fires to go out without rituals of purification and renewal invoking Vesta. Although she does not figure prominently in many myths, she was an important household goddess for Greco-Roman women.

Amaterasu

Amaterasu is the Japanese Shinto sun goddess. When Amaterasu was born, she was so brilliant that her parents sent her to heaven to rule over the earth. To manage affairs there, say some legends, she sent first her son, then her grandson, to earth. From Amaterasu’s grandson descended the Japanese royal family, who invoked their descent from Amaterasu in defense of their right to rule until 1945. That's some heavy defense.

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